Cancer

The story of GARP: a potential target for cancer immunotherapy

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. Despite significant advances in therapies for this particular cancer, the five-year survival rate is 12 percent, according to the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Poor kidney function linked to higher cancer risk

A new study has uncovered a modestly higher cancer risk in individuals with mild to severe chronic kidney disease, driven primarily by skin (non-melanoma) and urogenital cancers. The findings, which appear in an upcoming ...

Health

What 5G means for our health

Much to the excitement of Australians, solid plans to roll out fast 5G mobile communication technology were announced in 2018. Behind the scenes, studies modelling the absorption patterns of 5G electromagnetic energy in human ...

Cancer

Low-cost 'cancer probe' could spot deadly melanoma early

Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is diagnosed in more than 130,000 people globally every year. Now, work is being done on a tool to help in its early detection: a simple, compact laser probe that can distinguish ...

Cancer

Do you need to wear sunscreen while skiing or snowboarding?

Yes, you definitely do. While the cold winter months may not immediately bring to mind warmth and sunshine, ultraviolet (UV) rays still pose a risk and you need to apply sunscreen before heading outdoors, just like in the ...

Cancer

Potential treatment for cancer in butterfly disease

Children with the severe skin disease, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), also known as butterfly disease, often develop an aggressive and fatal skin cancer by early adulthood. Now an international team of ...

Health

Seven myths and truths about healthy skin

Skin is our largest organ and something we may take for granted when it's healthy. As an academic dermatologist I frequently hear misleading "facts" that seem to be stubbornly enduring. Here are some of the most commonly ...

Health

Bad reaction from a new tattoo? Here's what to do

(HealthDay)—The biggest worry a person usually has when they're getting a tattoo is how it will look. But sometimes, getting inked can lead to something worse than bad body art, an expert warns.

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Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

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