Oncology & Cancer

Blood test for deadly eye melanoma

A simple blood test could soon become the latest monitoring tool for the early detection of melanoma in the eye.

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer trends in Canada from 1971 to 2015

The overall rate of new cancer cases is decreasing in men but increasing in women younger than 80 years, and obesity-related cancers are increasing in young people, according to a study on cancer trends in Canada from 1971 ...

Oncology & Cancer

Study: Melanoma rates drop sharply among teens, young adults

Cases of melanoma among U.S. adolescents and young adults declined markedly from 2006 to 2015—even as the skin cancer's incidence continued to increase among older adults and the general population during the span, new ...

Oncology & Cancer

New drug combos may prevent resistance to melanoma treatments

A Michigan State University study led by a physiology graduate student in the College of Human Medicine has found that new drug combinations may prevent melanoma, an often deadly form of skin cancer, from becoming resistant ...

Medical research

Some skin cancers may start in hair follicles

Some of the most deadly skin cancers may start in stem cells that lend color to hair, and originate in hair follicles rather than in skin layers, a new study finds.

Health

Health disparities: Why do women live longer than men?

On average, men's lives are less healthy—and shorter—than women's. This health disparity exists in part because women take better care of themselves than men do. But several recent studies have found that in many cases, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Bariatric surgery linked to reduced risk for skin cancer

(HealthDay)—For individuals with obesity, bariatric surgery is associated with a reduced risk for skin cancer, including melanoma, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in JAMA Dermatology.

Oncology & Cancer

Study fingers new player in cancer immunity

The immune system must strike an exquisite balance between vanquishing infections and cancer, while at the same time restraining its activity to avoid inadvertently attacking the body's healthy tissues and organs.

Oncology & Cancer

Are we overestimating lifetime cancer risks?

The method employed in Australia to calculate the lifetime risks of cancer diagnosis and mortality overestimates these risks, especially for men, according to the authors of research published online today by the Medical ...

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Melanoma i/ˌmɛləˈnoʊmə/ (from Greek μέλας - melas, "dark") is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can occur in any part of the body that contains melanocytes.

Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers. However, it is much more dangerous and causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly. The diagnosis is more frequent in women than in men and is particularly common among Caucasians living in sunny climates, with high rates of incidence in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Latin America, and northern Europe. According to a WHO report, about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year.

The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy. The chance of a cure is greatest when the tumor is discovered while it is still small and thin, and can be entirely removed surgically.

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