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Genetics news

Genetics

World's first gene therapy for glycogen storage disease produces remarkable results

At the Association for Glycogen Storage Disease's 41st Annual Conference, Dr. David Weinstein of UConn School of Medicine and Connecticut Children's presented his groundbreaking, one-year clinical trial results for the novel ...

Oncology & Cancer

Ancient viruses could help kill cancers

DNA "echoes" of viruses that infected our ancestors millions of years ago could help the immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, according to new research from Crick scientists.

Genetics

Whole genome sequencing for prenatal diagnosis

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Faculty of Medicine at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has successfully introduced a new genome sequencing technique for prenatal invasive genetic diagnosis. ...

Genetics

Genes, the social environment, and adolescent smoking

Adolescence is a time of dramatic change. It marks a period of significant physical transformation—such as the drive toward sexual maturity. But it can also be a time of considerable psychological change and social experimentation.

Genetics

Cause of rare, fatal disorder in young children pinpointed

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis appear to have solved a decades-long mystery regarding the precise biochemical pathway leading to a fatal genetic disorder in children that results in seizures, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Gene-targeted cancer drugs, slow release overcome resistance

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method to address failures in a promising anti-cancer drug, bringing together tools from genome engineering, protein engineering and biomaterials science to improve ...

Genetics

Renegade genes caught red handed

The guardians of the human genome that work to prevent potentially disease-causing gene expression might not be as effective at their jobs as previously thought, according to new University of Arizona research.